Chapter

Transcending Place and Time: A Response to David Brown on Enchantment, Epistemology, and Experience

Charles Taliaferro

in Theology, Aesthetics, and Culture

Published in print September 2012 | ISBN: 9780199646821
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191744853 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199646821.003.0009
Transcending Place and Time: A Response to David Brown on Enchantment, Epistemology, and Experience

Show Summary Details

Preview

After an overview of some of the main themes of God and Enchantment of Place, this chapter defends the continuing importance of contemporary analytic philosophy of religion. Brown criticizes the formal character of the various appeals to religious experience made by William Alston, Alvin Plantinga, and Richard Swinburne. The chapter argues in reply that although Brown demonstrates the enchanting allure and compelling interest of Christian faith, particularly for an aesthetically-oriented audience, we still need the work of Alston, Plantinga, Swinburne and others to secure a stable epistemology. The chapter concludes with friendly observations and suggestions to strengthen Brown's project: notably how Brown's work offers an interesting reply to the ‘hiddenness of God’ objection, Brown's affinity to Cambridge Platonism, and how his focus on the enchantment of space may usefully incorporate more reflection on the enchantment of time and of our encounter, in time, of the eternal God.

Keywords: David Brown; religious experience; enchantment; epistemology; William P. Alston; Alvin Plantinga; Richard Swinburne; hiddenness of God; Cambridge Platonism; time

Chapter.  5478 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.