Chapter

: Where Have all the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction

Henry E. Allison

in Essays on Kant

Published in print June 2012 | ISBN: 9780199647033
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191741166 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199647033.003.0003
: Where Have all the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction

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This essay contains a “friendly” critique of Béatrice Longuenesse's interpretation of the transcendental deduction in her Kant and the Capacity to Judge. The critique is friendly because it acknowledges the many virtues of this important book, particularly her emphasis on the significance of the capacity to judge [Urteilskraft] for the argument of the first Critique. Nevertheless, it maintains that she neither provides an adequate account of the role of the categories in the two parts of the deduction nor explains how these two parts are supposed to provide a single proof of the categories as Kant claims.

Keywords: capacity to judge; categories; Critique of Pure Reason; Béatrice Longuenesse; proof; transcendental deduction

Chapter.  6451 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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