Chapter

Identity, Distinction, or Tension in Trinitarian Language?: ‘Loose’ Approaches to the Son’s Aseity

Brannon Ellis

in Calvin, Classical Trinitarianism, and the Aseity of the Son

Published in print June 2012 | ISBN: 9780199652402
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191742002 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199652402.003.0005
Identity, Distinction, or Tension in Trinitarian Language?: ‘Loose’ Approaches to the Son’s Aseity

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This chapter employs the conclusions of Chapter 3 to begin to frame the entire autothean controversy — both its beginnings, as explored in Chapters 1 and 2, and the post-Reformation development of the distinct approaches to Calvin's trinitarianism and its implications in the years between his death and the turn of the eighteenth century. Simply speaking, there are two antithetical approaches to scriptural language regarding immanent divine unity and plurality: identification (unitarianism) or distinction (trinitarianism). Proponents of the latter may be further distinguished regarding self-consistency in relating both ways of speaking of God, in the context of autothean concerns. After briefly discussing the identification approach, the chapter introduces the five main trinitarian alternatives represented in the autothean controversies, and explores the two ‘loosest’ accounts: the subordinationism of Arminius's Remonstrant followers, and the formalism of the Reformed rationalist Herman Alexander Röell.

Keywords: Arminianism; Arminius; procession; Reformed; Remonstrants; Herman Alexander Röell; Post-Reformation; subordinationism; taxis

Chapter.  16087 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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