Chapter

The defence of the faith

Alexandra da Costa

in Reforming Printing

Published in print July 2012 | ISBN: 9780199653560
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191742026 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199653560.003.0005

Series: Oxford English Monographs

The defence of the faith

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This chapter explores how Syon's commitment to pastoral care became bound up with concerns over the spread of evangelical thought. It highlights Tyndale's criticism of Syon as a place where lip labour dominated and the brethren's sense that the very definition of orthodoxy was being challenged. Influenced by Alec Ryrie and Peter Marshall's arguments on the fluidity of early sixteenth-century religious identities, it argues that Bonde and Whitford attempted to pin down what it meant to be a heretic and to reject evangelical arguments that they were the true followers of Christ. Instead, they advanced a definition of orthodoxy as sharing in the common and long-standing belief of the Church. At first they did so primarily by reaffirming the core beliefs of the Church, but as evangelical ideas seemed to gain ground in royal circles, they turned to defending their own way of life against specific attacks.

Keywords: orthodoxy; heresy; evangelism; religious identity; pope; eucharist

Chapter.  15829 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

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