Chapter

The Matter of the Soul’s Activities

Thomas Kjeller Johansen

in The Powers of Aristotle's Soul

Published in print October 2012 | ISBN: 9780199658435
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191742231 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199658435.003.0009
The Matter of the Soul’s Activities

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Aristotle's account of affections ‘common to body and soul’ suggests that the formal account of a psychological affection implies a specific account of the bodily side of this affection. This is because the form as a final cause hypothetically necessitates certain material changes. DA II.5's account of perception does not contradict this diagnosis, since viewing perception as a fulfilment and a perfective alteration (in a manner derived from Phys. II.3) does not exclude this but leaves it open both that perception may involve material changes and what such changes might be. As a perfective alteration perception may involve material changes in other categories of change, or within the same category. The point is demonstrated by Aristotle's accounts of hearing, smell, and touch.

Keywords: material change; hypothetical necessity; perfection; categories of change

Chapter.  13975 words. 

Subjects: Ancient Philosophy

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