Chapter

Cultural Integration in Germany

Amelie Constant, Olga Nottmeyer and Klaus Zimmermann

in Cultural Integration of Immigrants in Europe

Published in print September 2012 | ISBN: 9780199660094
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191748936 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660094.003.0003

Series: Studies of Policy Reform


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This chapter studies the integration process of immigrants in Germany by comparing certain immigrant groups to natives, differentiating them by gender and immigrant generation. The indicators that capture the cultural integration of immigrants are, in particular, differences in marital behaviour, language abilities, ethnic identification, and religious activity. A special feature of our data is the rich information about overall life satisfaction, risk aversion, and political interest. The chapter employs the latter indicators, comparing immigrants to natives and differentiating by ethnic origin, gender, and immigrant generation. This allows for an analysis of differences by ethnic groups and their evolution over time, and enables us to study in depth the cultural integration processes of immigrants. Besides cultural integration, the chapter also studies the economic integration of immigrants via female labour force participation. Empirical findings suggest that there are differences among immigrant groups and between immigrants and native Germans; the most significant differences exist vis-à-vis ethnic origin, gender, and generation. However, differences seem to diminish for the second generation. This indicates a greater adaptation to German norms and habits, and thus a better cultural, socio-economic and political integration of second-generation immigrants in Germany.

Keywords: cultural integration; immigrants; Germany; ethnic origin; gender; generation

Chapter.  14706 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Public Economics ; International Economics

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