Chapter

Defining Slavery in all its Forms: Historical Inquiry as Contemporary Instruction

Joel Quirk

in The Legal Understanding of Slavery

Published in print September 2012 | ISBN: 9780199660469
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191745508 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199660469.003.0015
Defining Slavery in all its Forms: Historical Inquiry as Contemporary Instruction

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This chapter shows that there is convincing historical and legal grounds for rethinking prevailing models on slavery. It first examines the changing status of slavery under international law, where the discussion focuses on the doubts that continue to surround the legal definition of slavery and other similar forms of bondage and the 1926 and 1956 Slavery Conventions. It then shifts to a study of the ways experiences of enslavement outside the United States can help inform the attempts to define and conceptualize slavery today. This chapter also considers the non-commercial features of slavery.

Keywords: legal definition; forms of bondage; slavery conventions; experiences of enslavement; non-commercial features; prevailing models

Chapter.  13432 words. 

Subjects: Human Rights and Immigration

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