Chapter

The <i>Dhimmī</i> Rules in the Post-Colonial Muslim State

Anver M. Emon

in Religious Pluralism and Islamic Law

Published in print July 2012 | ISBN: 9780199661633
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191743399 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199661633.003.0007

Series: Oxford Islamic Legal Studies

The Dhimmī Rules in the Post-Colonial Muslim State

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This chapter addresses two case studies of how premodern Islamic legal answers are used to respond to contemporary questions of governance. The case studies concern Saudi Arabia and Malaysia. In the Saudi Arabian case, the example concerns how premodern dhimmī rules inform the liability structure in wrongful death claims. The Malaysia case concerns a recent legal controversy about apostasy, where a woman sought to convert from Islam to Christianity. Although the second case is not strictly about the dhimmīs, it nonetheless highlights alongside the Saudi Arabian case how contemporary conditions of governance and Rule of Law give new meaning or intelligibility to premodern legal answers.

Keywords: Saudi Arabia; wrongful death; Malaysia; Lina Joy; apostasy

Chapter.  16860 words. 

Subjects: History of Law

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