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Nuclear Weapons and International Relations Since the End of the Cold War

David Holloway

in International Relations Since the End of the Cold War

Published in print December 2012 | ISBN: 9780199666430
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191745607 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199666430.003.0009
Nuclear Weapons and International Relations Since the End of the Cold War

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This chapter explores the ways in which the nuclear danger has been redefined since the end of the Cold War and the efforts that have been made to strengthen the nuclear order. A global nuclear war is no longer the main worry, but the danger that nuclear weapons will be used in regional conflicts has become more acute. Nuclear proliferation has become the central issue in nuclear politics, with North Korea, Iran, Iraq, and Libya the focus of international attention. The United States and some (but not all) other countries see nuclear terrorism as the greatest threat. The Obama Administration has proposed measures to strengthen the nonproliferation regime and to move toward nuclear disarmament. The prospects for success remain unclear.

Keywords: nuclear weapons; proliferation; Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty; disarmament; terrorism

Chapter.  8158 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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