Chapter

Life as It Should Be, The Right of the People Not to Know, and Conspiracies of Silence

Nachman Ben-Yehuda

in Theocratic Democracy

Published in print October 2010 | ISBN: 9780199734863
Published online January 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199895090 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734863.003.0008
Life as It Should Be, The Right of the People Not to Know, and Conspiracies of Silence

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This chapter examines how the printed press constructed Haredi unconventional and deviant behaviors. While the Israeli cultural conflict between seculars and religious, democrats and theocrats is played out in a number of arenas, the media is a central one. This public arena is not just a simple or complex reflection of the conflict. It is where the conflict itself is played out. The words chosen, the images invoked and the topics focused on are crucial. The chapter compares the different newspapers. While secular newspapers champion the right of the people to know and describe life “as is,” Haredi newspapers – typically referred to as Haredonim – adhere to a policy of the right of the people not to know and tend to describe life as it should be, giving rise to conspiracies of silence.

Keywords: conspiracies; haredonim; newspapers; right to know

Chapter.  10007 words. 

Subjects: Religious Studies

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