Chapter

Refracting Ritual: An Upside-Down Perspective on Ritual, Media, and Conflict

Michael Houseman

in Ritual, Media, and Conflict

Published in print March 2011 | ISBN: 9780199735235
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199895175 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199735235.003.0009

Series: Oxford Ritual Studies Series

Refracting Ritual: An Upside-Down Perspective on Ritual, Media, and Conflict

Show Summary Details

Preview

This critical response to the chapters is not a mere polite afterword but rather a chapter in its own right. In the process of evaluating and teasing out the implications of the book’s preceding chapters, this chapter forges an understanding of ritual. What is dubbed here “identity-refracting” rituals are characterized by a high degree of self-consciousness, the use of immaterial props, and deliberative creativity—three characteristics less typical of “canonical” rituals. This chapter states that understanding the dynamics of identity refraction can sharpen or further enlighten the views of ritual, media, and conflict proposed by the volume’s other chapters.

Keywords: ritual; media; conflict; identity; creativity; self-consciousness

Chapter.  13122 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Religious Studies

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.