Chapter

Culture

Timothy B. Smith, Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez and Guillermo Bernal

in Psychotherapy Relationships That Work

Second edition

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780199737208
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199894635 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737208.003.0016
Culture

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients’ cultural backgrounds. This chapter begins by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 patients. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. This chapter recommends a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients’ culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments.

Keywords: psychotherapy outcomes; ethnic minority groups; culture; meta-analysis; evidence-based practice; treatment adaptation

Chapter.  10261 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Psychology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.