Chapter

Constitutional agnosticism and the establishment clause

Paul Horwitz

in The Agnostic Age

Published in print December 2010 | ISBN: 9780199737727
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199895267 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737727.003.0007
Constitutional agnosticism and the establishment clause

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This chapter points out that the creation of the Establishment Clause prohibits any binding structure in a community that serves as a reservoir to where all inquiries relating to the legal and political cultures come from. Indicated in the Establishment Clause are two central interests—government's financial support to religious activities, and contingencies pertaining to the level of loyalty, exhibit of the Ten Commandments in public, and practice of prayers in the academe. Both arenas are mounted by the chapter; however, it insists that constitutionally agnostic methods bring forth consistency and comprehensiveness, since they are directed towards questions on religious verity.

Keywords: Establishment Clause; legal culture; political culture; government; religious verity

Chapter.  24789 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law

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