Chapter

Science and Darwinism

Paul C. Gutjahr

in Charles Hodge

Published in print March 2011 | ISBN: 9780199740420
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199894703 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199740420.003.0056
Science and Darwinism

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Chapter fifty-six takes a close look at Hodge’s lifelong commitment and interest in science. As many as twenty percent of Repertory articles concerned themselves with science, and Hodge remained committed throughout his life to seeing a close connection between scientific and religious inquiry. His last book, What is Darwinism?, functioned largely as a defense of the complementary nature of science and religion. Hodge believed Darwinism to be atheistic because it posited a theory of world development that had no place for a Divine Designer. Darwin’s theories implied a randomness that had no place in Hodge’s views of Divine Soveriegnty.

Keywords: Charles Hodge; Charles Darwin; Arnold Guyot; Day-Age Theory; Princeton Club; Darwinism; William Paley; Asa Gray; Archibald Alexander Hodge; geology; biology; What is Darwinism; Pieree-Simon Laplace; Nebula Theory

Chapter.  3322 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

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