Chapter

Discrimination and Self-Knowledge

Patrick Greenough

in Introspection and Consciousness

Published in print July 2012 | ISBN: 9780199744794
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199933396 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199744794.003.0012

Series: Philosophy of Mind Series

Discrimination and Self-Knowledge

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The chapter shows that a variety of Cartesian Conceptions of the mental are unworkable. In particular, the chapter offers a much weaker conception of limited discrimination than the one advanced by Williamson (2000) and show that this weaker conception, together with some plausible background assumptions, is not only able to undermine the claim that our core mental states are luminous (roughly: if one is in such a state then one is in a position to know that one is) but also the claim that introspection is infallible with respect to our core mental states (where a belief that C obtains is infallible just in case if one believes that C obtains then C obtains). The upshot is a broader and much more powerful case against the Cartesian conception of the mental than has been advanced hitherto.

Keywords: introspection; discriminability; self-knowledge; safety; margins for error; infallibility; luminosity; self-intimation; privileged access

Chapter.  10126 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Mind

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