Chapter

Implications for Understanding and Making Use of Dreams: Alone, in a Group, or in Therapy

Ernest Hartmann

in The Nature and Functions of Dreaming

Published in print November 2010 | ISBN: 9780199751778
Published online January 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199863419 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199751778.003.0013
Implications for Understanding and Making Use of Dreams: Alone, in a Group, or in Therapy

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Dreaming has a primary function in making connections and integration of memory—functions which occur whether or not a dream is remembered in the morning. However, when we do remember a dream it can be useful to us in other ways, including self-knowledge, which can be life altering, and making new scientific or artistic discoveries. This chapter argues that working with dreams can be helpful in self-knowledge and self-awareness. Numerous others have made the same discovery. Dream interpretation played a prominent part in Freudian psychoanalysis for many years, though it has been somewhat deemphasized recently. It is still a very prominent part of Jungian analysis. Outside of formal psychoanalysis and psychotherapy there is a popular movement, sometimes called dream-working, in which people get together in pairs or small groups to discuss and try to understand their dreams with or without a leader or a formal agenda.

Keywords: memory; dream interpretation; psychotherapy

Chapter.  6699 words. 

Subjects: Cognitive Psychology

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