Chapter

Rough-and-Tumble Play and the Cooperation–Competition Dilemma: Evolutionary and Developmental Perspectives on the Development of Social Competence

Joseph L. Flanders, Khalisa N. Herman and Daniel Paquette

in Evolution, Early Experience and Human Development

Published in print November 2012 | ISBN: 9780199755059
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780199979479 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755059.003.0023
Rough-and-Tumble Play and the Cooperation–Competition Dilemma: Evolutionary and Developmental Perspectives on the Development of Social Competence

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This chapter examines how humans and other mammals develop the competence necessary to adapt to the complexities of group living. The authors argue that rough-and-tumble (R&T) play promotes the development of social competence, social cognition, and self-regulation by providing young mammals with embodied practice in activities that involve both cooperation and competition. Evidence for this argument is reviewed from research in evolutionary, developmental, and clinical psychology, which highlights the roles of fathers in the development of social adaptation in human children.

Keywords: rough-and-tumble play; social competence; fathers; aggression; self-regulation; social cognition

Chapter.  8022 words. 

Subjects: Developmental Psychology

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