Chapter

Speaker Intent and Convention; Linguistic Meaning and Pragmatics; Vagueness and Indeterminacy

Kent Greenawalt

in Legal Interpretation

Published in print November 2010 | ISBN: 9780199756131
Published online January 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199855292 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199756131.003.0002
Speaker Intent and Convention; Linguistic Meaning and Pragmatics; Vagueness and Indeterminacy

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This chapter considers related subjects about which scholars in the philosophy of language, and in the related discipline of linguistics, write. The first of these is a reflection on the nature of linguistic and other human communication. The broad second subject includes standards of linguistic meaning and the pragmatics of communication—how listeners understand speakers, the relevance of context, and what is implied by what is expressed. The chapter then turns to philosophic writing about vagueness, and its possible relevance for legal interpretation.

Keywords: philosophy of language; linguistic meaning; human communication; pragmatics; vagueness

Chapter.  20481 words. 

Subjects: Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law

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