Chapter

Bilateral Will and National Resilience (1982–1984)

Ulrich Krotz

in Flying Tiger

Published in print July 2011 | ISBN: 9780199759934
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199897193 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199759934.003.0004
Bilateral Will and National Resilience (1982–1984)

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This chapter picks up where Chapter 3 left off, reconstructing and analyzing the continuation of Franco-German combat helicopter dealings from October 1982 to May 1984. At the end of this critical period, Germany and France, via an intergovernmental agreement in the form of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), jointly embarked on the common development of a second-generation combat helicopter. The chapter first discusses the history of Franco-German defense affairs, beginning with the bilateral re-launch of the program at the fortieth Franco-German summit consultation in Bonn in October 1982 and continuing through subsequent Franco-German interaction. It culminates in the initiation of the enormous joint armament project in May 1984, with the signing of the Franco-German MoU during the forty-third Franco-German summit in Rambouillet. It then investigates the contents of the MoU contract, as the definition or nondefinition of common interests, positions, and goals regarding all aspects pertaining to the helicopter program—including the machine's technical specifications, its delivery schedules, and its financing. After focusing on the institutionalized meanings and purposes underlying the political processes of the period under review, the chapter presents as cases the three main outcomes that need explanation during this period: the revival of the program in the fall of 1982; the French and German interests and positions that were modified during the interaction processes between 1982 and 1984; and the interests and positions that have remained unaffected by the interaction in the same time period.

Keywords: Franco-German relations; France; Germany; combat helicopters; defense policy; memorandum of understanding

Chapter.  11187 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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