Chapter

Massachusetts

Scott Douglas Gerber

in A Distinct Judicial Power

Published in print May 2011 | ISBN: 9780199765874
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199896875 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199765874.003.0016
Massachusetts

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Constitutional and Administrative Law

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Massachusetts was among the most consequential of the original thirteen states. Many of the events that led to the Declaration of Independence took place there: the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, and the shot heard—around the world—to mention three that have become American folklore. Massachusetts was also home to a number of the most influential figures in early American history: William Bradford, John Winthrop, James Otis, and John Adams. Most important for present purposes, Massachusetts, through the determined efforts of John Adams, played a leading role in the origins of an independent judiciary in the United States. This chapter chronicles the genesis of Adams's idea in Massachusetts.

Keywords: John Adams; independent judiciary; judicial power; William Bradford; Massachusetts; John Winthrop; James Otis

Chapter.  13840 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.