Chapter

North Carolina

Scott Douglas Gerber

in A Distinct Judicial Power

Published in print May 2011 | ISBN: 9780199765874
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199896875 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199765874.003.0021
North Carolina

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This chapter traces the history of judicial independence in North Carolina. The North Carolina Constitution of 1776 contained all three of the central tenets of judicial independence: the judiciary was a separate institution of government; judges served for life during good behavior; and they received adequate salaries. It had come a long way from the days in which the lords proprietors were conferred “full and absolute power” by the crown—including judicial power—for the “good and happy government of the said province”.

Keywords: independent judiciary; judicial power; North Carolina Constitution; judicial independence

Chapter.  18180 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law

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