Chapter

Musical Narratives of the Fractured Body: Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bartók, and Copland

Joseph N. Straus

in Extraordinary Measures

Published in print March 2011 | ISBN: 9780199766451
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199895007 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766451.003.0006
Musical Narratives of the Fractured Body: Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bartók, and Copland

Show Summary Details

Preview

The “late style” is a longstanding aesthetic category in all of the arts. Late-style music is presumed to have certain internal qualities (such as fragmentation, intimacy, nostalgia, or concision) and to be associated with certain external factors (such as the age of the composer and his or her proximity to or foreknowledge of death). However, late style is better correlated with the bodily or mental condition of the composer: Most composers who write in what is recognized as a late style have shared experiences of non-normative bodily or mental function, that is, of impairment and disability. Composers (including Beethoven, Schoenberg, Bartók, Copland, and Stravinsky) inscribe their disabilities in their music, and the result is often correlated with what is generally called late style.

Keywords: late style; Beethoven; Schoenberg; Bartók; Copland; Stravinsky

Chapter.  10211 words. 

Subjects: Popular Music

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.