Chapter

Persian Success: Conquest and Kingship, 525–518

Stephen Ruzicka

in Trouble in the West

Published in print April 2012 | ISBN: 9780199766628
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199932719 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199766628.003.0003

Series: Oxford Studies in Early Empires

Persian Success: Conquest and Kingship, 525–518

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Thanks to Egyptian political discord, Persian conquest of Egypt, undertaken by Cambyses, was surprisingly easy. But the Persians were well aware of the need to hold on to Egypt and the difficulties involved. The solution employed by Cambyses, even after a revolt by Delta dynasts, was to assume the identity of an Egyptian king and at the same time to employ various pragmatic security measures, including maintaining garrison forces in existing fortified sites, cultivating relations with Delta dynasts and their subordinate machimoi, and creating better links between Egypt and the rest of the empire by fostering urbanization on the Sinai Peninsula route and linking Egypt to the Red Sea and points further east through completion of a canal linking the Nile and the Red Sea.

Keywords: Cambyses; Psammetichus; Machimoi; Darius; Udjahorresnet; Memphis

Chapter.  6147 words. 

Subjects: Classical History

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