Chapter

Christianity and Other Religions

Michael J. McClymond and Gerald R. McDermott

in The Theology of Jonathan Edwards

Published in print December 2011 | ISBN: 9780199791606
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199932290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199791606.003.0036
Christianity and Other Religions

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Until very recently, the vast majority of readers and even scholars of Jonathan Edwards have assumed that he had little or no interest in religions beyond Judaism and Christianity, and certainly no knowledge of the great traditions beyond Palestine. Recent research, however, has shown that, from the very beginning of his career, Edwards showed interest in other religions, and that he seemed to become more and more intrigued the older he got. This chapter suggests one major stimulus to Edwards's fascination with the religions (deism), and then outlines three approaches he took to them. One goes back to Adam and the sons of Noah (the prisca theologia), one is based on Edwards's conviction that God speaks through all of nature and history (typology), and the third stems from his thinking about whether non-Christians can be saved (his dispositional soteriology).

Keywords: world religions; prisca theologia; typology; soteriology; disposition; deism

Chapter.  8600 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Christian Theology

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