Chapter

Codifying Extraterritoriality

Pär Kristoffer Cassel

in Grounds of Judgment

Published in print January 2012 | ISBN: 9780199792054
Published online May 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199932573 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199792054.003.0002

Series: Oxford Studies in International History

Codifying Extraterritoriality

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This chapter charts the evolution of jurisdiction over foreigners in Qing China from the late nineteenth century through the Sino-British “Chefoo Convention” of 1876, which was the last British treaty to deal with extraterritoriality to any large extent before the turn of the century. Prior to the Opium War, the Qing Empire granted foreigners far more legal autonomy than the contemporary Ottoman Empire did under the “Capitulations,” a series of treaties between the Sublime Porte and Western nations, which were concluded from the sixteenth through the early nineteenth centuries.

Keywords: Qing Empire; unequal treaties; Opium War; Chefoo Convention

Chapter.  11531 words. 

Subjects: Asian History

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