Chapter

From Studious Irrelevancy to Consilient Knowledge: Modes of Scholarship and Cultural Anthropology<sup>1</sup>

Pascal Boyer

in Creating Consilience

Published in print December 2011 | ISBN: 9780199794393
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199919338 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794393.003.0006

Series: New Directions in Cognitive Science

From Studious Irrelevancy to Consilient Knowledge: Modes of Scholarship and Cultural Anthropology1

Show Summary Details

Preview

How does the community of social scientists actually decide that a certain research program counts as a contribution to social science? On what criteria? The opposition between scientific and nonscientific modes, or perhaps humanities versus science is too simple, and there are in fact three clearly distinct ideal types here. These are referred to as ideal-types to avoid the suggestion that any discipline or field is organized exclusively around all of these possible modes of transmission, although in many fields one of them is clearly dominant. The three modes are called science, erudition, and relevant connections, respectively. This chapter briefly describes these three modes before applying this model to the specific case of kinship in anthropology.

Keywords: science; anthropology; consilience; reductionism; humanities; social science; epistemology

Chapter.  7544 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Philosophy

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.