Chapter

Later Evangelical Consolation Literature I

Ronald K. Rittgers

in The Reformation of Suffering

Published in print July 2012 | ISBN: 9780199795086
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199950171 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199795086.003.0008

Series: Oxford Studies in Historical Theology

Later Evangelical Consolation Literature I

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This chapter examines the great proliferation of consolation literature in the later Lutheran Reformation (1550–1600), commenting on how these works were both more comprehensive in scope than earlier works and also more specific in terms of the kinds of suffering they address. This chapter shows how a number of themes related to the Protestant theology of suffering come into sharper focus in these later works of consolation: the communal aspect of consolation, the importance of self-preparation for times of suffering, the necessity of gradual purification over time and the (surprising) role of human agency in this process, miracles, healing, angels, and the role of the body in Protestant piety. The chapter also discusses the differing attitudes toward Christ’s suffering in Lutheran and Reformed works of consolation.

Keywords: suffering; consolation; body; miracles; angels; healing; Protestant piety

Chapter.  13966 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Christianity

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