Chapter

Isocrates, Plato, and Quintilian: Revision, Pedagogy, and the Formation of Selves

Sean Alexander Gurd

in Work in Progress

Published in print December 2011 | ISBN: 9780199837519
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199919505 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199837519.003.0002

Series: American Philological Association American Classical Studies Series

Isocrates, Plato, and Quintilian: Revision, Pedagogy, and the Formation of Selves

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The oldest and the most long-standing way to think about literary revision in classical antiquity was to see it as a teaching tool whose goal was to create what Pierre Bourdieu called a habitus, that is, a set of skills and expectations regulating social performance. In Isocrates, in Plato, and much later in Quintilian, the practice of revision created subjects capable of giving advice, pursuing philosophical dialogue, and engaging in oratorical debate. The primary aim of revision for these authors was to teach specific cognitive skills; these skills were like revision but occurred mentally. The practice of literary revision was thus a way of training thought or producing selves.

Keywords: Plato; Isocrates; Quintilian; revision; education; self; habitus; subjectivity

Chapter.  11415 words. 

Subjects: Classical Literature

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