Chapter

Becoming a “Black Spot”

Fiona Vernal

in The Farmerfield Mission

Published in print August 2012 | ISBN: 9780199843404
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199950546 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199843404.003.0008
Becoming a “Black Spot”

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Farmerfield’s apartheid designation as a “black spot” in a white area transformed its residents into “squatters” who were among the millions forcibly removed and resettled in South Africa’s bantustans. Oral histories capture the poignant and painful stories of migration and dispossession that defined twentieth century South Africa as Farmerfield confronted an apartheid regime bent on dividing the country along strict racial and ethnic lines. The government razed Farmerfield’s homes and resettled its residents near King Williams Town. In the new settlement of Mimosa Park they faced poverty and new obstacles in building a new community as young people sought employment in urban centres, others left to pursue an education while elders tried to 1960s until the 1990s when the land reclamation process began.

Keywords: Apartheid Black spot; forced removal; squatters Surplus People; squatter Bantustan; Mimosa Park

Chapter.  15193 words. 

Subjects: Christianity

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