Chapter

TO THE EXTENT THAT PARTICIPATION IS A MEASURE OF SUCCESS: TRANSPARENCY IN THE SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND

Robert Reville and Jeremiah Goulka

in Confidentiality, Transparency, and the U.S. Civil Justice System

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780199914333
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199980185 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199914333.003.0005
TO THE EXTENT THAT PARTICIPATION IS A MEASURE OF SUCCESS: TRANSPARENCY IN THE SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND

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This chapter investigates options and tensions in the implementation of transparency policy through a case study of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund (VCF), a federally funded administrative compensation system for the victims of the 9/11 attacks. The VCF offers a useful example of how information disclosed by a compensation program may be intended both to promote the program's democratic legitimacy through accountability—transparency's usual justification in the context of public programs—and also to encourage participation in the program. The chapter begins by discussing key concepts in transparency theory, such as the relationship between transparency and accountability. Next it describes the circumstances that forged the VCF, the nature and extent of the program's disclosure of information, and the purposes these disclosures served. It concludes by drawing implications of this case study for other government programs and for the civil justice system.

Keywords: transparency policy; policy implementation; VCF; 9/11 victims; civil justice system

Chapter.  9956 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law

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