Chapter

Into the delays of lawyers

Lord Denning

in The Due Process of Law

Published in print January 1980 | ISBN: 9780406176080
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191705113 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780406176080.003.0015
Into the delays of lawyers

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Constitutional and Administrative Law

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Ever since lawyers have been going, the layman has complained of their delays: and for just as long, lawyers have been making excuses. The most common excuse is their busyness. It is a common ploy among barristers to ‘seme bisier’ than they are. If a person is busy, he is successful: if he is not busy, he is a failure. So it is important to ‘seme bisy’. The real reason for the delays of lawyers is not slackness or dilatoriness. They are as a class the most hardworking of all professional men. It often lies in their choice of priorities. Each case is important and must be dealt with. Each letter must be answered the same day or at any rate the next. A sudden call puts something else out of mind. The courts expect each client's case to be dealt with expeditiously.

Keywords: barristers; lawyers; delays; courts; client's case

Chapter.  3491 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.