Article

Science and Communication

Celeste M. Condit and L. Bruce Railsback

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication


Published online November 2016 | e-ISBN: 9780190228613 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.013.35

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Whether understood as a set of procedures, statements, or institutions, the scope and character of science has changed through time and area of investigation. The prominent current definition of science as systematic efforts to understand the world on the basis of empirical evidence entails several characteristics, each of which has been deeply investigated by multidisciplinary scholars in science studies. The aptness of these characteristics as defining elements of science has been examined both in terms of their sufficiency as normative ideals and with regard to their fit as empirical descriptors of the actual practices of science. These putative characteristics include a set of commitments to (1) the goal of developing maximally general, empirically based explanations certified through falsification procedures, predictive power, and/or fruitfulness and application, (2) meta-methodologies of hypothesis testing and quantification, and (3) relational norms including communalism, universalism, disinterestedness, organized skepticism, and originality. The scope of scientific practice has been most frequently identified with experimentation, observation, and modeling. However, data mining has recently been added to the scientific repertoire, and genres of communication and argumentation have always been an unrecognized but necessary component of scientific practices. The institutional home of science has also changed through time. The dominant model of the past three centuries has housed science predominantly in universities. However, science is arguably moving toward a “post-academic” era.

Keywords: science; science studies; rhetoric of science; philosophy of science; science communication; methodology; epistemology; public understanding of science; science education

Article.  11898 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Communication Studies

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