Article

Classification and Mitigation of Soil Salinization

Tibor Tóth

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Environmental Science


Published online March 2017 | e-ISBN: 9780199389414 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780199389414.013.265

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  • Pollution and Threats to the Environment (Social Science)
  • Agriculture and Farming

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Soil salinity has been causing problems for agriculturists for millennia, primarily in irrigated lands. The importance of salinity issues is increasing, since large areas are affected by irrigation-induced salt accumulation. A wide knowledge base has been collected to better understand the major processes of salt accumulation and choose the right method of mitigation. There are two major types of soil salinity that are distinguished because of different properties and mitigation requirements. The first is caused mostly by the large salt concentration and is called saline soil, typically corresponding to Solonchak soils. The second is caused mainly by the dominance of sodium in the soil solution or on the soil exchange complex. This latter type is called “sodic” soil, corresponding to Solonetz soils. Saline soils have homogeneous soil profiles with relatively good soil structure, and their appropriate mitigation measure is leaching. Naturally sodic soils have markedly different horizons and unfavorable physical properties, such as low permeability, swelling, plasticity when wet, and hardness when dry, and their limitation for agriculture is mitigated typically by applying gypsum. Salinity and sodicity need to be chemically quantified before deciding on the proper management strategy. The most complex management and mitigation of salinized irrigated lands involves modern engineering including calculations of irrigation water rates and reclamation materials, provisions for drainage, and drainage disposal. Mapping-oriented soil classification was developed for naturally saline and sodic soils and inherited the first soil categories introduced more than a century ago, such as Solonchak and Solonetz in most of the total of 24 soil classification systems used currently. USDA Soil Taxonomy is one exception, which uses names composed of formative elements.

Keywords: Sodium Adsorption Ratio; Exchangeable Sodium Percent; salt accumulation; Solonetz; Solonchak; Solod; irrigation; leaching; drainage

Article.  10205 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Pollution and Threats to the Environment (Social Science) ; Agriculture and Farming

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