Chapter

History and power, from below and above

in Postcolonialism

Published in print June 2003 | ISBN: 9780192801821
Published online September 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191775451 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780192801821.003.0003

Series: Very Short Introductions

History and power, from below and above

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  • National Liberation and Post-Colonialism
  • Literary Studies (Postcolonial Literature)

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‘History and power, from below and above’ explores how Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro Improvement Association, was an example of what Salman Rushdie characterizes as the state of being a ‘translated man’, that is, someone who is ‘translated’ across cultures. Garvey's call for the restitution of the dignity of the black man was a call to self-translation. Translation is a way of thinking about how languages, people, and cultures are transformed as they move between different places. It can also be used more metaphorically, as a way of describing how the individual or the group can be transformed by changing their sense of their own place in society.

Keywords: James Baldwin; Sidney Bechet; Sir Winston Churchill; Marcus Garvey; Arthur Harris; Langston Hughes; Malcolm X; Claude McKay; Paul Robeson; Satanic Verses; translation

Chapter.  5708 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: National Liberation and Post-Colonialism ; Literary Studies (Postcolonial Literature)

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