Chapter

The transcendental deduction

Roger Scruton

in Kant

Published in print August 2001 | ISBN: 9780192801999
Published online September 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191775482 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780192801999.003.0003

Series: Very Short Introductions

The transcendental deduction

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • History of Western Philosophy
  • 17th - 18th Century Philosophy
  • Christianity
  • Political Theory

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Kant asks: how is synthetic a priori knowledge possible? His answer to this question contains two parts, one of which is subjective and the other objective. ‘The transcendental deduction’ looks at these deductions, explains what they each mean, and relates them to the concept of ‘transcendental deduction’. The subjective deduction tries to show what is involved in making a judgement on whether something is true or false. Its conclusions are presented as part of a general theory of the ‘understanding’. Kant wishes to draw limits of understanding. The objective deduction consists of a positive attempt to establish the content of a priori knowledge. It is an exploration of its grounds, for truth follows from the fact that we have experience. This is the ‘transcendental deduction’.

Keywords: Aristotle; deduction; empiricism; David Hume; John Locke; Isaac Newton; Plato; rationalism; science; substance; Ludwig Wittgenstein

Chapter.  6633 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy ; 17th - 18th Century Philosophy ; Christianity ; Political Theory

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.