Journal Article

Food Insufficiency and Income Volatility in US Households: The Effects of Imputed Income in the Survey of Income and Program Participation

Molly Dahl, Thomas DeLeire and Shannon Mok

in Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy

Volume 36, issue 3, pages 416-437
Published in print September 2014 | ISSN: 2040-5790
Published online May 2014 | e-ISSN: 2040-5804 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aepp/ppu009
Food Insufficiency and Income Volatility in US Households: The Effects of Imputed Income in the Survey of Income and Program Participation

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  • Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
  • Data Collection and Date Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs
  • Agricultural Economics

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In this article, we explore how using imputed income data in the Survey of Income and Program Participation affects the observed relationship between household income volatility and food insufficiency. We find that measuring income volatility using imputed income data substantially understates the association between large drops in household income and food insufficiency. After excluding observations with imputed income, large drops in income are associated with a 2.1–percentage point increased probability of food insufficiency, or a 31% higher likelihood of food insufficiency.

Keywords: Data imputation; food insufficiency; C18; C81; Q18

Journal Article.  7381 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General ; Data Collection and Date Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs ; Agricultural Economics

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