Journal Article

Agreement on Nutrient Intake between the Databases of the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the ESHA Food Processor

Lydia A. Bazzano, Jiang He, Lorraine G. Ogden, Catherine M. Loria, Suma Vupputuri, Leann Myers and Paul K. Whelton

in American Journal of Epidemiology

Published on behalf of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Volume 156, issue 1, pages 78-85
Published in print July 2002 | ISSN: 0002-9262
Published online July 2002 | e-ISSN: 1476-6256 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwf003
Agreement on Nutrient Intake between the Databases of the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the ESHA Food Processor

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The objective of this study was to assess agreement on nutrient intake between the nutrient database of the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES I) and an up-to-date (December 1998) nutrient database, the ESHA Food Processor. Analysis was conducted among 11,303 NHANES I participants aged 25–74 years in 1971–1975 who had undergone dietary assessment. A list of all unique foods consumed was obtained from a single 24-hour dietary recall questionnaire administered during the baseline NHANES I visit. Foods on the list were matched to foods in the ESHA Food Processor software. Agreement between participants’ nutrient intakes as calculated with the NHANES I and ESHA nutrient databases was assessed using intraclass correlation analysis, linear regression analysis, and graphic methods. Intraclass correlation analysis demonstrated excellent concordance between most nutrient intakes, with coefficients above 0.95 for intakes of energy, carbohydrates, protein, cholesterol, and calcium; coefficients between 0.90 and 0.95 for intakes of total fat, saturated fat, potassium, and vitamin C; and coefficients of approximately 0.85 for intakes of sodium and vitamin A. Graphic methods and regression analyses also showed good-to-excellent correspondence for most nutrients. These findings support the validity of expanding existing nutrient intake databases to explore current hypotheses, provided that food formulation, enrichment, and fortification practices have not changed substantially over time.

Keywords: cohort studies; data collection; diet; nutrition surveys; nutritive value; Abbreviations: NHANES I, First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; NHEFS, NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study; USDA, US Department of Agriculture.

Journal Article.  4978 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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