Journal Article

<i>Helicobacter pylori</i> Infection in Different Generations of Hispanics in the San Francisco Bay Area

Chiaojung J. Tsai, Sharon Perry, Luz Sanchez and Julie Parsonnet

in American Journal of Epidemiology

Published on behalf of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Volume 162, issue 4, pages 351-357
Published in print August 2005 | ISSN: 0002-9262
Published online August 2005 | e-ISSN: 1476-6256 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwi207
Helicobacter pylori Infection in Different Generations of Hispanics in the San Francisco Bay Area

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To quantify the contributions of household and environmental factors to Helicobacter pylori infection, the authors examined H. pylori infection among several generations of Hispanics in the San Francisco Bay Area. Between 2000 and 2004, household members were tested for H. pylori and interviewed about demographic factors and household pedigree. An immigrant was defined as someone born in Latin America with at least one Latin America-born parent; a first-generation US-born Hispanic was defined as someone born in the United States with at least one Latin America-born parent; and a second-generation US-born Hispanic was defined as someone born in the United States with at least one US-born parent. Prevalences of H. pylori in immigrants and first- and second-generation US-born Hispanics were 31.4% (102/325), 9.1% (98/1,076), and 3.1% (2/64), respectively. Compared with second-generation US-born Hispanics, the age-adjusted odds ratios for H. pylori were 9.70 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57, 60.00) for immigrants and 4.32 (95% CI: 0.69, 26.96) for first-generation US-born Hispanics (ptrend < 0.001). These odds ratios decreased to 6.19 (95% CI: 1.13, 33.77) and 3.24 (95% CI: 0.59, 17.82), respectively, after adjustment for parental infection (odds ratio (OR) = 2.94, 95% CI: 1.59, 4.38), low education (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.20, 2.68), and crowding (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.79). Both the household and birth-country environments probably contributed to declining H. pylori prevalence among successive generations of Hispanics.

Keywords: disease transmission; Helicobacter pylori; Hispanic Americans; immigrants; infection; prevalence; social class; CI, confidence interval; SIFT, Stanford Infection and Familial Transmission

Journal Article.  4244 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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