Journal Article

Parental Occupational Exposure to Pesticides and Childhood Germ-Cell Tumors

Zhi Chen, Patricia A. Stewart, Stella Davies, Roger Giller, Mark Krailo, Mary Davis, Leslie Robison and Xiao-Ou Shu

in American Journal of Epidemiology

Published on behalf of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Volume 162, issue 9, pages 858-867
Published in print November 2005 | ISSN: 0002-9262
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1476-6256 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwi294
Parental Occupational Exposure to Pesticides and Childhood Germ-Cell Tumors

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In a recently completed US case-control study (Children's Oncology Group, 1993–2001) with 253 cases and 394 controls, the authors investigated the association between parental occupational exposure to pesticides and risk of childhood germ-cell tumors. Information on occupational pesticide exposure was collected using job-specific module questionnaires and assessed by an experienced industrial hygienist. Odds ratios for childhood germ-cell tumors associated with maternal exposures before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and after the birth of the index child were 1.0 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 1.4), 1.1 (95% CI: 0.7, 1.6), and 1.3 (95% CI: 0.9, 1.8), respectively. Paternal exposures before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and after the birth of the index child were not related to germ-cell tumors (odds ratios (ORs) were 0.9 (95% CI: 0.7, 1.2), 0.8 (95% CI: 0.5, 1.2), and 0.8 (95% CI: 0.5, 1.3), respectively). When both parents had ever been occupationally exposed to pesticides before the index pregnancy, the odds ratio was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.4, 1.3). Subgroup analyses showed a positive association between maternal exposure to herbicides during the postnatal period and risk of germ-cell tumors in girls (OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 5.2) and an inverse association between paternal exposure to pesticides during the index pregnancy and germ-cell tumors in boys (OR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1, 1.0). This study did not provide strong evidence supporting a relation between parental pesticide exposure in the workplace and risk of germ-cell tumors among offspring.

Keywords: case-control studies; child; germinoma; occupational exposure; pesticides; CI, confidence interval; COG, Children's Oncology Group; SES, socioeconomic status

Journal Article.  6338 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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