Journal Article

Whole Grains and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in a Large Population-based Case-Control Study in the San Francisco Bay Area, California

June M. Chan, Furong Wang and Elizabeth A. Holly

in American Journal of Epidemiology

Published on behalf of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Volume 166, issue 10, pages 1174-1185
Published in print November 2007 | ISSN: 0002-9262
Published online September 2007 | e-ISSN: 1476-6256 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwm194
Whole Grains and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in a Large Population-based Case-Control Study in the San Francisco Bay Area, California

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Epidemiologic data suggest that consumption of whole-grain products may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. Grain intake was examined in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer in the San Francisco Bay Area (1995–1999). A 131-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was administered to 532 cases and 1,701 controls. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed as estimates of relative risk. Persons who consumed ≥2 servings of whole grains daily had a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than persons who consumed <1 serving/day (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.31, 1.2; trend-p = 0.04). Similar results were observed for brown rice (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.44, 1.2; trend-p = 0.01) and tortillas (OR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). Consumption of doughnuts (≥2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) conferred increased risk (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7; trend-p = 0.003). Consumption of cooked breakfast cereals (≥2 servings/week vs. <1 serving/month) was positively associated with risk (for oatmeal/oat bran, OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.7; for other cooked breakfast cereals, OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.4, 3.3). Dietary fiber was inversely associated with risk (for highest quartile vs. lowest, OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.47, 0.89; trend-p = 0.02). These data provide some support for the hypothesis that consuming more whole-grain or high-fiber foods may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Refined grains were not associated with risk.

Keywords: case-control studies; cereals; diet surveys; dietary fiber; pancreatic neoplasms

Journal Article.  5130 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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