Journal Article

Phylogeny of <i>Sinojackia</i> (Styracaceae) Based on DNA Sequence and Microsatellite Data: Implications for Taxonomy and Conservation

Xiaohong Yao, Qigang Ye, Peter W. Fritsch, Boni C. Cruz and Hongwen Huang

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 101, issue 5, pages 651-659
Published in print April 2008 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online February 2008 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcm332
Phylogeny of Sinojackia (Styracaceae) Based on DNA Sequence and Microsatellite Data: Implications for Taxonomy and Conservation

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  • Ecology and Conservation
  • Evolutionary Biology
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Background and Aims

The genus Sinojackia consists of eight species, all endemic to China. All species of Sinojackia are endangered or threatened owing to poor recruitment within populations. Information on molecular phylogenetics is critical for developing successful conservation strategies for this genus.

Methods

Combined DNA sequence data from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions and plastid psbAtrnH intergenic spacer and microsatellite data were used to infer a phylogeny of the genus.

Key Results

Parsimony analysis of the combined sequence data and multivariate analysis based on fruit characters indicated that Sinojackia dolichocarpa is monophyletic and genetically well separated from the other Sinojackia species, thus supporting its rank at the generic level as Changiostyrax. Phylogenetic relationships within Sinojackia sensu stricto are unresolved from the combined sequence data. A UPGMA dendrogram based on seven microsatellite loci of 96 individual plants yielded a first-diverging cluster of all individuals of S. microcarpa. The remaining species form another cluster without any definitive patterns corresponding to current species circumscriptions, suggesting either extensive hybridization or incipient speciation.

Conclusions

The results suggest that there are too many species recognized within Sinojackia sensu stricto, but this must be further assessed with comprehensive morphological and taxonomic revisionary work. The implications of the phylogenetic data for conservation are discussed.

Keywords: Changiostyrax; conservation; phylogeny; Sinojackia; Styracaceae

Journal Article.  5041 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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