Journal Article

Nutrient and growth responses of cattail (<i>Typha domingensis</i>) to redox intensity and phosphate availability

Shuwen Li, Jørgen Lissner, Irving A. Mendelssohn, Hans Brix, Bent Lorenzen, Karen L. McKee and Shili Miao

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 105, issue 1, pages 175-184
Published in print January 2010 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online September 2009 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcp213
Nutrient and growth responses of cattail (Typha domingensis) to redox intensity and phosphate availability

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  • Ecology and Conservation
  • Evolutionary Biology
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Background and Aims

In the Florida Everglades, the expansion of cattail (Typha domingensis) into areas once dominated by sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) has been attributed to altered hydrology and phosphorus (P) enrichment. The objective of this study was to quantify the interactive effects of P availability and soil redox potential (Eh) on the growth and nutrient responses of Typha, which may help to explain its expansion.

Methods

The study examined the growth and nutrient responses of Typha to the interactive effects of P availability (10, 80 and 500 µg P L−1) and Eh level (−150, +150 and +600 mV). Plants were grown hydroponically in a factorial experiment using titanium (Ti3+) citrate as a redox buffer.

Key Results

Relative growth rate, elongation, root-supported tissue/root ratio, leaf length, lateral root length and biomass, as well as tissue nutrient concentrations, were all adversely affected by low Eh conditions. P availability compensated for the negative effect of low Eh for all these variables except that low P stimulated root length and nutrient use efficiency. The most growth-promoting treatment combination was 500 µg P L−1/ + 600 mV.

Conclusions

These results, plus previous data on Cladium responses to P/Eh combinations, document that high P availability and low Eh should benefit Typha more than Cladium as the growth and tissue nutrients of the former species responded more to excess P, even under highly reduced conditions. Therefore, the interactive effects of P enrichment and Eh appear to be linked to the expansion of Typha in the Everglades Water Conservation Area 2A, where both low Eh and enhanced phosphate availability have co-occurred during recent decades.

Keywords: Everglades; growth; nutrient; phosphorus; redox potential; Typha domingensis

Journal Article.  7634 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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