Journal Article

Recovery dynamics of growth, photosynthesis and carbohydrate accumulation after de-submergence: a comparison between two wetland plants showing escape and quiescence strategies

Fang-Li Luo, Kerstin A. Nagel, Hanno Scharr, Bo Zeng, Ulrich Schurr and Shizue Matsubara

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 107, issue 1, pages 49-63
Published in print January 2011 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online November 2010 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcq212
Recovery dynamics of growth, photosynthesis and carbohydrate accumulation after de-submergence: a comparison between two wetland plants showing escape and quiescence strategies

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Ecology and Conservation
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background and Aims

The capacity for fast-growth recovery after de-submergence is important for establishment of riparian species in a water-level-fluctuation zone. Recovery patterns of two wetland plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides and Hemarthria altissima, showing ‘escape’ and ‘quiescence’ responses, respectively, during submergence were investigated.

Methods

Leaf and root growth and photosynthesis were monitored continuously during 10 d of recovery following 20 d of complete submergence. Above- and below-ground dry weights, as well as carbohydrate concentrations, were measured several times during the experiment.

Key Results

Both species remobilized stored carbohydrate during submergence. Although enhanced internode elongation depleted the carbohydrate storage in A. philoxeroides during submergence, this species resumed leaf growth 3 d after de-submergence concomitant with restoration of the maximal photosynthetic capacity. In contrast, some sucrose was conserved in shoots of H. altissima during submergence, which promoted rapid re-growth of leaves 2 d after de-submergence and earlier than the full recovery of photosynthesis. The recovery of root growth was delayed by 1–2 d compared with leaves in both species.

Conclusions

Submergence tolerance of the escape and quiescence strategies entails not only the corresponding regulation of growth, carbohydrate catabolism and energy metabolism during submergence but also co-ordinated recovery of photosynthesis, growth and carbohydrate partitioning following de-submergence.

Keywords: Alternanthera philoxeroides; carbohydrate; flooding; Hemarthria altissima; leaf growth; root growth; shade; submergence; wetland plant

Journal Article.  8591 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.