Journal Article

Linking water stress effects on carbon partitioning by introducing a xylem circuit into L-PEACH

David Da Silva, Romeo Favreau, Iñigo Auzmendi and Theodore M. DeJong

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 108, issue 6, pages 1135-1145
Published in print October 2011 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online May 2011 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcr072
Linking water stress effects on carbon partitioning by introducing a xylem circuit into L-PEACH

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  • Ecology and Conservation
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

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Background and Aims

Many physiological processes such as photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration can be strongly influenced by the diurnal patterns of within-tree water potential. Despite numerous experiments showing the effect of water potential on fruit-tree development and growth, there are very few models combining carbohydrate allocation with water transport. The aim of this work was to include a xylem circuit into the functional–structural L-PEACH model.

Methods

The xylem modelling was based on an electrical circuit analogy and the Hagen–Poisseuille law for hydraulic conductance. Sub-models for leaf transpiration, soil water potential and the soil–plant interface were also incorporated to provide the driving force and pathway for water flow. The model was assessed by comparing model outputs to field measurements and published knowledge.

Key Results

The model was able to simulate both the water uptake over a season and the effect of different irrigation treatments on tree development, growth and fruit yield.

Conclusions

This work opens the way to a new field of modelling where complex interactions between water transport, carbohydrate allocation and physiological functions can be simulated at the organ level and describe functioning and behaviour at the tree scale.

Keywords: Carbon allocation; water stress; xylem; functional–structural plant modelling; plant growth simulation; L-PEACH

Journal Article.  7480 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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