Journal Article

Using functional–structural plant models to study, understand and integrate plant development and ecophysiology

Theodore M. DeJong, David Da Silva, Jan Vos and Abraham J. Escobar-Gutiérrez

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 108, issue 6, pages 987-989
Published in print October 2011 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online October 2011 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcr257
Using functional–structural plant models to study, understand and integrate plant development and ecophysiology

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Ecology and Conservation
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Functional–structural plant models (FSPMs) explore and integrate relationships between a plant's structure and processes that underlie its growth and development. In recent years, the range of topics being addressed by scientists interested in functional–structural plant modelling has expanded greatly. FSPM techniques are now being used to dynamically simulate growth and development occurring at the microscopic scale involving cell division in plant meristems to the macroscopic scales of whole plants and plant communities. The plant types studied also cover a broad spectrum from algae to trees. FSPM is highly interdisciplinary and involves scientists with backgrounds in plant physiology, plant anatomy, plant morphology, mathematics, computer science, cellular biology, ecology and agronomy. This special issue of Annals of Botany features selected papers that provide examples of comprehensive functional–structural models, models of key processes such as partitioning of resources, software for modelling plants and plant environments, data acquisition and processing techniques and applications of functional–structural plant models for agronomic purposes.

Keywords: Functional–structural plant model; light; modular plant architecture; plant modelling; resource acquisition and partitioning; simulation

Journal Article.  2342 words. 

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.