Journal Article

The impact of dehydration rate on the production and cellular location of reactive oxygen species in an aquatic moss

Ricardo Cruz de Carvalho, Myriam Catalá, Jorge Marques da Silva, Cristina Branquinho and Eva Barreno

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 110, issue 5, pages 1007-1016
Published in print October 2012 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online August 2012 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcs180
The impact of dehydration rate on the production and cellular location of reactive oxygen species in an aquatic moss

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  • Ecology and Conservation
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Background and Aims

The aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica requires a slow rate of dehydration to survive a desiccation event. The present work examined whether differences in the dehydration rate resulted in corresponding differences in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and therefore in the amount of cell damage.

Methods

Intracellular ROS production by the aquatic moss was assessed with confocal laser microscopy and the ROS-specific chemical probe 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. The production of hydrogen peroxide was also quantified and its cellular location was assessed.

Key Results

The rehydration of slowly dried cells was associated with lower ROS production, thereby reducing the amount of cellular damage and increasing cell survival. A high oxygen consumption burst accompanied the initial stages of rehydration, perhaps due to the burst of ROS production.

Conclusions

A slow dehydration rate may induce cell protection mechanisms that serve to limit ROS production and reduce the oxidative burst, decreasing the number of damaged and dead cells due upon rehydration.

Keywords: Cell survival; confocal microscopy; dehydration rate; desiccation; diaminobenzidine; dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate; Fontinalis antipyretica; oxygen consumption; reactive oxygen species; ROS

Journal Article.  6274 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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