Journal Article

Nocturnal and daytime stomatal conductance respond to root-zone temperature in ‘Shiraz’ grapevines

Suzy Y. Rogiers and Simon J. Clarke

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 111, issue 3, pages 433-444
Published in print March 2013 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online January 2013 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcs298

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Background and Aims

Daytime root-zone temperature may be a significant factor regulating water flux through plants. Water flux can also occur during the night but nocturnal stomatal response to environmental drivers such as root-zone temperature remains largely unknown.

Methods

Here nocturnal and daytime leaf gas exchange was quantified in ‘Shiraz’ grapevines (Vitis vinifera) exposed to three root-zone temperatures from budburst to fruit-set, for a total of 8 weeks in spring.

Key Results

Despite lower stomatal density, night-time stomatal conductance and transpiration rates were greater for plants grown in warm root-zones. Elevated root-zone temperature resulted in higher daytime stomatal conductance, transpiration and net assimilation rates across a range of leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficits, air temperatures and light levels. Intrinsic water-use efficiency was, however, lowest in those plants with warm root-zones. CO2 response curves of foliar gas exchange indicated that the maximum rate of electron transport and the maximum rate of Rubisco activity did not differ between the root-zone treatments, and therefore it was likely that the lower photosynthesis in cool root-zones was predominantly the result of a stomatal limitation. One week after discontinuation of the temperature treatments, gas exchange was similar between the plants, indicating a reversible physiological response to soil temperature.

Conclusions

In this anisohydric grapevine variety both night-time and daytime stomatal conductance were responsive to root-zone temperature. Because nocturnal transpiration has implications for overall plant water status, predictive climate change models using stomatal conductance will need to factor in this root-zone variable.

Keywords: Water-use efficiency; leaf gas exchange; CO2 assimilation; grapevine; Vitis vinifera; stomatal conductance; root-zone temperature; ‘Shiraz’; grapevine; soil temperature

Journal Article.  7299 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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