Journal Article

Influence of Procedural Learning on Iowa Gambling Task Performance Among HIV+ Individuals with History of Substance Dependence

Raul Gonzalez, Margaret Wardle, Joanna Jacobus, Jasmin Vassileva and Eileen M. Martin-Thormeyer

in Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

Published on behalf of The National Academy of Neuropsychology

Volume 25, issue 1, pages 28-38
Published in print February 2010 | ISSN: 0887-6177
Published online November 2009 | e-ISSN: 1873-5843 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/arclin/acp094
Influence of Procedural Learning on Iowa Gambling Task Performance Among HIV+ Individuals with History of Substance Dependence

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HIV+ individuals have been shown to demonstrate deficits on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a complex measure of “decision-making.” Little remains known about what other neurocognitive processes may account for variability in IGT performance among HIV+ samples or the role of procedural learning (PL) in IGT performance. A sample of 49 HIV+ individuals with a history of substance use disorders was examined to explore the relationship between IGT performance and three measures of PL: The Rotary Pursuit, Mirror Star Tracing, and Weather Prediction tasks. We found no statistically significant relationships between IGT performance and any of the PL tasks, despite finding significant correlations among the PL tasks. This pattern of results persisted when analyzing IGT performance in various ways (e.g., performance on earlier trial blocks or impairment classifications). Although other nondeclarative processes (e.g., somatic markers) may be important for IGT performance, these findings do not support PL as an important component neurocognitive process for the IGT. Similarly, these results suggest that differences in PL performance does not account for the decision-making deficits or variability in performances observed on the IGT among HIV+ individuals with a history of substance dependence.

Keywords: HIV; Substance use disorders; Nondeclarative memory; Implicit memory; Decision-making; Basal ganglia; Orbitofrontal cortex; Executive functions

Journal Article.  7337 words. 

Subjects: Neuroscience ; Neuropsychology

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