Journal Article

Trapline foraging by bumblebees: I. Persistence of flight-path geometry

James D. Thomson

in Behavioral Ecology

Published on behalf of International Society for Behavioral Ecology

Volume 7, issue 2, pages 158-164
Published in print January 1996 | ISSN: 1045-2249
Published online January 1996 | e-ISSN: 1465-7279 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/7.2.158
Trapline foraging by bumblebees: I. Persistence of flight-path geometry

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Ecology and Conservation
  • Zoology and Animal Sciences

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

By setting out arrays of potted plants of Penstemon strictus, I tested whether freely foraging bumblebee (Bombus spp. ) workers would establish regular foraging routes that reflected the geometry of the array. They did, passing through an asymmetrical array in a pattern that minimized interplant flight distances. After the array was changed to a symmetrical pattern, however, the experienced bees continued to show their previous asymmetrical flight patterns. New bees without experience on the asymmetrical array showed no asymmetry on the symmetrical array. I term this persistence of flight-path geometry “trapline holdover, ” and discuss its implications for the study of animals' learning and foraging behavior.

Keywords: bee; Bombus; foraging; foraging area; movement rules; orientation; Penstemon strictus; spatial learning; trapline; (Behav Ecol 7: 158-164 (1996)]

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Evolutionary Biology ; Ecology and Conservation ; Zoology and Animal Sciences

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.