Journal Article

Whence Philosophy of Biology?

Jason M. Byron

in The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science

Published on behalf of British Society for the Philosophy of Science

Volume 58, issue 3, pages 409-422
Published in print September 2007 | ISSN: 0007-0882
Published online June 2007 | e-ISSN: 1464-3537 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjps/axm021
Whence Philosophy of Biology?

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A consensus exists among contemporary philosophers of biology about the history of their field. According to the received view, mainstream philosophy of science in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s focused on physics and general epistemology, neglecting analyses of the ‘special sciences’, including biology. The subdiscipline of philosophy of biology emerged (and could only have emerged) after the decline of logical positivism in the 1960s and 70s. In this article, I present bibliometric data from four major philosophy of science journals (Erkenntnis, Philosophy of Science, Synthese, and the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science), covering 1930–59, which challenge this view. 1

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Journal Article.  4799 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Philosophy of Science ; Science and Mathematics

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